miguel-cardona

19 / The Significance of Contributive Design

Description

As organizations move inexorably to a team-based, agile methodology, how do individual contributors effectively demonstrate what they’re working on or what they’ve accomplished? If performance is measured based solely on the team’s deliverables, how do team leaders acknowledge each member’s contribution or target their professional development opportunities? Enter the notion of contributive design, which fosters an environment in which team members collaborate as one, but also where they’re not necessarily dependent on others for their own outcomes.

In this episode, hosts Sean and Paul welcome Miguel Cardona, professor of design, artist, and recent keynote speaker at ITX’s 2nd annual ITX UX 2019: Beyond the Pixels design conference. Miguel discusses contributive design and its far-reaching impacts – not only in the classroom, where contributive tools help him evaluate the performance of entire teams while isolating the contributions of each student. Contributive design, Miguel explains, applies with equal significance in the workplace especially as we consider the modular nature of teams, design systems, and the user experience.

Recommended Resources

Writings and Notes from Andrew Duckworth, including “One Thing Per Page.”

Design Is Storytelling, by Ellen Lupton.

Algortihms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism, by Safiya Umoja Noble.

fertilegroundroc.org, an exploration of race and placemaking in Rochester, NY. In collaboration with cultural anthropologist and University of Rochester Professor Kathryn Mariner, Fertile Ground sprouts from three existing intellectual traditions: theories of space and place, urban ethnography and history, and feminist and Black geographies.


About Miguel

Miguel Cardona is an Assistant Professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology in the New Media Design (BFA) and Visual Communications Design (MFA) programs. His classes focus on user experience and interaction design for digital experiences and products. Students from these programs are highly marketable and go on to design at companies like Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Marvel, Lyft, Amazon, Nike, and numerous other high-profile product and creative agencies all over the world.

Most recently, Miguel was a foundation hire and lead designer for imgix, a San Francisco-based company that provides web developers the ability to resize and optimize images in real-time. Previously, he co-founded the Rochester, NY-based design and technology studio, Dwaiter Design. Miguel has more than 15 years’ experience designing and developing digital products, e-learning experiences, motion graphics, advertising, and interactive games for not-for-profit, educational, and B2B institutions. He was once mildly internet-famous for illustrating on coffee cups.

t l

Listen READ MORE

Enjoying the podcast? Sign up for email reminders to be the first to know about new episodes.